the zen project

What I want to talk about is how emotional outbursts typically more associated with men (shouting, expressing anger openly) are given a pass in public discourse in a way that emotional outbursts typically more associated with women (crying, “getting upset”) are stigmatized. I wish to dispel the notion that women are “more emotional.” I don’t think we are. I think that the emotions women stereotypically express are what men call “emotions,” and the emotions that men typically express are somehow considered by men to be something else. This is incorrect. Anger? EMOTION. Hate? EMOTION. Resorting to violence? EMOTIONAL OUTBURST. An irrational need to be correct when all the evidence is against you? Pretty sure that’s an emotion. Resorting to shouting really loudly when you don’t like the other person’s point of view? That’s called “being too emotional to engage in a rational discussion.” Not only do I think men are at least as emotional as women, I think that these stereotypically male emotions are more damaging to rational dialogue than are stereotypically female emotions. A hurt, crying person can still listen, think, and speak. A shouting, angry person? That person is crapping all over meaningful discourse.

Bullish Life: When Men Get Too Emotional To Have A Rational Argument

(via introvertedactivist

(via vomohiper)

THIS! And this is why I think it is so important to reject the false binary of “logic vs. emotion.” We are taught to believe that what men think/feel/do = “not emotion” and what women think/feel/do “is emotion,” where “emotional” is a pejorative against women.

(via heyreadabook)

(Source: champagnecandy)


Wait for the guy that pursues you. The one who will make an ordinary moment seem magical. The kind of guy that brings out the best of you and makes you wanna be a better person. Wait for a guy that will be your best friend. Who will drop everything to be with you at any time. No matter what the circumstances. Wait for the guy who makes you smile like no one else. And when he smiles you know he needs you. Wait for the guy that wants to show you off to the world when you’re in sweats and have no make up on, but loves it when you get all dolled up for him. And most of all, wait for the guy that will put you in the center of his universe because that’s where you belong.

— thelovenotebook (via thelovenotebook)


lovelyandbrown:

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)
Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate
When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.
In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.
Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.
In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

She grew up!She’s such a doll. Bless her.
lovelyandbrown:

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)
Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate
When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.
In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.
Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.
In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

She grew up!She’s such a doll. Bless her.
lovelyandbrown:

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)
Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate
When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.
In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.
Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.
In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

She grew up!She’s such a doll. Bless her.
lovelyandbrown:

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)
Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate
When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.
In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.
Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.
In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

She grew up!She’s such a doll. Bless her.

lovelyandbrown:

yagazieemezi:

Know Safa Idriss Nour (then & now)

Super model Waris Dirie Somali model insisted Safa Idriss Nour, the child who played her suffering FGM in biopic, had to be spared the same fate

When she was three years old, Safa Idriss Nour received something no girl in her slum in Djibouti had been given before – a signed contract from her parents stating they would never inflict genital mutilation on her.

In Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa, an estimated 98% of girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), a procedure that usually involves cutting off the clitoris and some of the labia, so this was a remarkable event. Equally remarkable is the story of how Nour came to get the contract and, indeed, of her battle to ensure that her parents stuck to the terms of the deal.

Nour starred in a film adaptation of Desert Flower, the international bestselling autobiography by Somali model and anti-FGM activist Waris Dirie. Published in 1997, her first book follows Dirie from her birth into a nomadic family in Somalia – from whom she fled, aged 13, after her father attempted to marry her to a 60-year-old man – to her becoming an international supermodel.

In 2007, Nour was asked to play the young Dirie as she undergoes FGM – on condition that her parents sign a contract agreeing never to perform the same ritualistic operation on her (keep reading)

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

She grew up!
She’s such a doll. Bless her.


lostinurbanism:

trais4lovers:

What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we examine the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

This montage sets the climate for an upcoming Sunday Kinfolk story.

Featuring Isaac Hayes, Walk On By

Written by D.Verrtah
Marcus Smith (Behind the Lens)
Russell Hamilton (Multimedia)
King Texas (Creative Director)
Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Sunday Kinfolk) 

"What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?"

Thank you x a million for posting and spreading the word on this project.


Why I Will Not March for Eric Garner →

lovelyandbrown:

selfloveperks:

lovelyandbrown:

I absolutely, 100% disagree with this woman. Like, I’m BAFFLED that a black woman wrote this and published it.

We either aid each other in progressing forward as a black people, a black family, or we stand back and watch a house divided fall.

I just…..can’t fully process my sadness in writing this post. She makes excellent points about the hurt and abuse of the black woman, but I don’t understand what it has to do with not honoring a life taken and the injustice that still exist AGAINST our own people.

More later, when I’m able to fully grasp the enormity of my horror.

Although I do see where you may disagree with the writer, I have to say that I see many areas where I do agree with her, as one commentator said: “This post is dealing with a hard truth. You will not find that the majority will agree. She is not dismissing the tragedy of Black men, because that would be damn near insane, but what she is saying is that our brothers are not wielding the same kind of energy that we do when they are victims of injustice. Come on, look at Renisha McBride! I myself, a Black woman, can not spit names of Black women who have been victimized by white supremacy. You know why, because it rarely takes center stage.

That being said, yesterday my 10 year old sister (who looks older for her age— some people even think she’s older than me) and I were going to play basketball. I was on my cell but I kept hearing someone saying hello and I looked up and saw this guy— probably in her 30s aggressively trying to talk to her. I cursed him out so bad and told him her age and he didn’t care. Sorry but not sorry, they (at least some and the internet will have you think the majority) don’t really care about us (ironically in my MJ voice).

I feel you and I hear that, but.
So that means we should step back?
So the distance and space between increases?

If that’s the solution for some, hey. By all means.
I just couldn’t sleep at night.