the zen project

lostinurbanism:

trais4lovers:

What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?

While staring in the face of racism, this story follows a young man’s journey as he comes to terms with his identity. As we extract events from America’s history and weave them with fictional undertones, we examine the truth behind his mother’s legacy, his father’s affiliation with the movement and the makings of a black superhero.

This montage sets the climate for an upcoming Sunday Kinfolk story.

Featuring Isaac Hayes, Walk On By

Written by D.Verrtah
Marcus Smith (Behind the Lens)
Russell Hamilton (Multimedia)
King Texas (Creative Director)
Renata Cherlise (Creative Director and Creator of Sunday Kinfolk) 

"What if Superman grew up as a black boy in America?"

Thank you x a million for posting and spreading the word on this project.


Why I Will Not March for Eric Garner →

lovelyandbrown:

selfloveperks:

lovelyandbrown:

I absolutely, 100% disagree with this woman. Like, I’m BAFFLED that a black woman wrote this and published it.

We either aid each other in progressing forward as a black people, a black family, or we stand back and watch a house divided fall.

I just…..can’t fully process my sadness in writing this post. She makes excellent points about the hurt and abuse of the black woman, but I don’t understand what it has to do with not honoring a life taken and the injustice that still exist AGAINST our own people.

More later, when I’m able to fully grasp the enormity of my horror.

Although I do see where you may disagree with the writer, I have to say that I see many areas where I do agree with her, as one commentator said: “This post is dealing with a hard truth. You will not find that the majority will agree. She is not dismissing the tragedy of Black men, because that would be damn near insane, but what she is saying is that our brothers are not wielding the same kind of energy that we do when they are victims of injustice. Come on, look at Renisha McBride! I myself, a Black woman, can not spit names of Black women who have been victimized by white supremacy. You know why, because it rarely takes center stage.

That being said, yesterday my 10 year old sister (who looks older for her age— some people even think she’s older than me) and I were going to play basketball. I was on my cell but I kept hearing someone saying hello and I looked up and saw this guy— probably in her 30s aggressively trying to talk to her. I cursed him out so bad and told him her age and he didn’t care. Sorry but not sorry, they (at least some and the internet will have you think the majority) don’t really care about us (ironically in my MJ voice).

I feel you and I hear that, but.
So that means we should step back?
So the distance and space between increases?

If that’s the solution for some, hey. By all means.
I just couldn’t sleep at night.


specialnights:

"We are all Trayvon Martin" by Huong
“We decided not to stay quiet and make sure that we would be the voice Trayvon Martin was not allowed to keep. That is why we created this work, to ensure that everyone knows of the horrors that are still evident in our society and to educate the public on the monstrosity of racism.” - Huong
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specialnights:

"We are all Trayvon Martin" by Huong

We decided not to stay quiet and make sure that we would be the voice Trayvon Martin was not allowed to keep. That is why we created this work, to ensure that everyone knows of the horrors that are still evident in our society and to educate the public on the monstrosity of racism.” - Huong


dynamicafrica:

Chimamanda Adichie speaks about the danger of a single Boko Haram Story.
Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks to BBC HARDtalk about why talk of Boko Haram should not center solely on gender.
Whilst gender does play a role in regards to the kidnapping of the teenage schoolgirls from Chibok, there’s a much bigger story at play. And with the ways in which framing has occurred around this particular story by foreign media, self-described pundits and online activists, there’s cause to be concerned about the danger of a single story about both Boko Haram and Nigeria being constructed as a result. The situation is highly complex and the hijacking, by non-Nigerians, of online activism campaigns spearheaded by Nigerians is a demonstration of how narratives created by Africans are only fit for mainstream consumption in the West if they fit certain stereotypical frameworks. As Adichie says:
"It’s a story that fits into certain expectations of what should happen in a place like Nigeria. It’s also a story that is easy to connect to emotionally without necessarily knowing what the political context is…Because of the emotional weight of the story it’s often being constructed in ways that…fit a prefabricated box."
Point of correction to the BBC: The #BringBackOurGirls campaign gained traction long before Michelle Obama jumped on board. The presenter is doing exactly what Adichie warns against.
Watch the interview here.
dynamicafrica:

Chimamanda Adichie speaks about the danger of a single Boko Haram Story.
Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks to BBC HARDtalk about why talk of Boko Haram should not center solely on gender.
Whilst gender does play a role in regards to the kidnapping of the teenage schoolgirls from Chibok, there’s a much bigger story at play. And with the ways in which framing has occurred around this particular story by foreign media, self-described pundits and online activists, there’s cause to be concerned about the danger of a single story about both Boko Haram and Nigeria being constructed as a result. The situation is highly complex and the hijacking, by non-Nigerians, of online activism campaigns spearheaded by Nigerians is a demonstration of how narratives created by Africans are only fit for mainstream consumption in the West if they fit certain stereotypical frameworks. As Adichie says:
"It’s a story that fits into certain expectations of what should happen in a place like Nigeria. It’s also a story that is easy to connect to emotionally without necessarily knowing what the political context is…Because of the emotional weight of the story it’s often being constructed in ways that…fit a prefabricated box."
Point of correction to the BBC: The #BringBackOurGirls campaign gained traction long before Michelle Obama jumped on board. The presenter is doing exactly what Adichie warns against.
Watch the interview here.

dynamicafrica:

Chimamanda Adichie speaks about the danger of a single Boko Haram Story.

Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie talks to BBC HARDtalk about why talk of Boko Haram should not center solely on gender.

Whilst gender does play a role in regards to the kidnapping of the teenage schoolgirls from Chibok, there’s a much bigger story at play. And with the ways in which framing has occurred around this particular story by foreign media, self-described pundits and online activists, there’s cause to be concerned about the danger of a single story about both Boko Haram and Nigeria being constructed as a result. The situation is highly complex and the hijacking, by non-Nigerians, of online activism campaigns spearheaded by Nigerians is a demonstration of how narratives created by Africans are only fit for mainstream consumption in the West if they fit certain stereotypical frameworks. As Adichie says:

"It’s a story that fits into certain expectations of what should happen in a place like Nigeria. It’s also a story that is easy to connect to emotionally without necessarily knowing what the political context is…Because of the emotional weight of the story it’s often being constructed in ways that…fit a prefabricated box."

Point of correction to the BBC: The #BringBackOurGirls campaign gained traction long before Michelle Obama jumped on board. The presenter is doing exactly what Adichie warns against.

Watch the interview here.